5 Ways to Reduce Scrap and Rework in Your Manufacturing Processes Register ico-close ico-supplier ico-white-paper-case-study ico-product ico-cad

Welcome to Thomas Insights — every day, we publish the latest news and analysis to keep our readers up to date on what’s happening in industry. Sign up here to get the day’s top stories delivered straight to your inbox. Scrap and rework in manufacturing are generally seen as an unavoidable and expensive part of doing business. But with careful planning, manufacturers can minimize the bottom-line impacts of materials costs and wasted labor. But first, some definitions: “scrap” refers to materials left over from product manufacturing and may range from metal shavings to whole parts. Scrap is different from “waste” in the sense that it is recyclable and therefore has some monetary value. “Rework” happens when an inspected part is found to be non-conforming, defective, or failed and must be disassembled, repaired, replaced, or reassembled. Damage to parts can occur during transit or whenever manual handling occurs, so it’s a good idea to use automation to limit physical contact with parts as much as possible – particularly delicate parts that will be damaged if dropped. Mike Lynch, the founder of CNC Concepts, points out that “excessive scrap-causing mistakes should be a...

Revving Up Tooling and Machining Strategies for Auto Parts

Advanced Manufacturing Media is a leading source for news and in-depth technical information about advanced manufacturing in North America. Perhaps the most common challenge in automotive machining these days is aluminum. “Even chassis components are transitioning to aluminum due to the higher strength properties achieved by forging aluminum,” explained Jeff Gimino, PCD and CBN product specialist for Walter USA, Waukesha, Wis. That includes control arms, bearing carriers, and steering knuckles. Gimino added that the high-strength aluminum alloys used in these applications generally have more silicon and magnesium to increase the tensile strength, but that also makes them tougher to machine. Aluminum has also taken over in automotive engine blocks, according to Walter’s William Radtke, manager of application development and machine tool builders, “We saw a big transition from irons and steels to a short transition to CGI (compacted graphite iron). But now virtually all blocks are aluminum,” he said. “I believe only one automotive maker in the U.S. still has a CGI block.” Machining the tougher aluminums generates a lot of heat, and heat causes tool wear. So, for heavy stock remova...